Low-Carb: What is it and how can it help me?

It’s not all fat & games (but fat does play a role!)

You may have heard a thing or two recently about low-carb diets. More and more news articles are popping up online and on TV, both for and against, doing the low-carb thing. With so many different cooks in the kitchen, the low-carb thing can be confusing.

But low-carb diets are exactly what they say they are: diets low in carbohydrate intake. They limit foods with carbohydrates (like pasta, bread, cereal, rice, potatoes, crackers, chips) and, instead, promote foods high in protein and fat (like nuts, fish, eggs, meat, seeds, vegetables). Technically, that does mean more bacon and butter. 🥓 Who’s in?

Why all the carb fuss?

Because: blood sugar. It’s that simple. Carbs, as wonderfully delicious as they are, increase blood sugar when consumed. Carbohydrates, along with sugar, will have the biggest, and possibly most detrimental, affect on blood glucose. All carbs raise blood sugar in some form or fashion; upon consumption, they immediately break down into glucose in your bloodstream. And the more glucose we have in our bloodstream, the higher our blood glucose levels, the worse we feel, and the higher our risk for serious complications.

How does low-carb help with diabetes?

Low-carb can be beneficial to absolutely everyone. But for those of us living with diabetes specifically, a lifestyle low in carbohydrates can truly be a lifesaver. Going (and staying) low-carb keeps blood sugars significantly more in-range; it means less insulin required and eliminates the yo-yo-ing we so often experience when sugars rise after eating carbs and we over-correct (and then over-correct by eating too much to over-correct the initial over-correction!).

Once you really get started on low-carb, you will be amazed at how well you’re able to maintain steady blood glucose levels. Not only that, but you’ll find you’re less hungry (weight loss!), and you might even notice a increased feeling of overall well-being (fewer blood sugar swings = fewer mood swings!). It all goes so hand-in-hand.

And if all of the above is still not enough, check out a few low-carb study findings here, here, herehere, and here to see just how beneficial limiting carbs can be.

📢 PSST! Don’t miss the One Drop Guide to Carbohydrates for a detailed breakdown on carbs. 👇

One Drop Guide to Carbohydrates!

What are my options?

There are tons of different low-carb options out there, so find one that works for YOU! This is not a one-size-fits-all deal. It’s a find-what-works-for-you mentality! In the next few weeks, we’ll be giving you the rundown on:

Atkins Diet

Paleo Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Dr. Bernstein Diet

Low-Glycemic Diet

South Beach Diet

And, of course, before getting on any low-carb diet plan, be sure you talk to your healthcare team (or One Drop | Expert) to discuss a game plan. Then, let us know which one you decide and how it works for you!

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Mary Elizabeth
Mary Elizabeth

Mary Elizabeth is a Marketing and Communications Manager at One Drop and has been living with T1D for over 20 years.