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mobile health apps and self-care

Self-care and empowerment in the age of the quantified self

The day my I found out I was expecting my first child, I wanted to learn anything and everything that was going to happen to my body and my baby over the next 9 months. Sure, I had appointments with OBs, midwives, and ultrasound technicians. I followed a relatively normal schedule of prenatal care. I checked. During my pregnancy with Elliott, I saw a healthcare professional 13 times.

But my two pregnancy apps? I looked at them EVERY DAY. Usually several times a day. I used one app to understand what was happening inside my body, and to see how Elliott was developing, track my weight changes, store health data and images I wanted to see and go back to. I used the other app to get advice about what to eat, what activities to avoid, and even what over the counter medications I could take. I looked to that app to decide how to take care of myself far more than I looked to my healthcare team for this advice.

Here I was, experiencing my first baby — arguably the most important thing to ever happen to my body — and the vast majority of how I took care of myself was directed and informed not by a qualified medical team, but by two health apps on my cell phone. This underscores a really important point: self-care is self-directed.

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No doctor told me to use those apps.

I chose them. I searched for them, I selected them, I downloaded them, and I decided they were good enough. After entering some personal data, my apps knew my due date, when my prenatal appointments should be, and what foods I should eat based on my weight changes… and I could store my sonogram photos and belly selfies. Just what I needed and wanted.

We’re in an age of the quantified self. With every click, our devices are capturing tons of data on what we do, how we live, and what we’re interested in. The digital revolution has brought with it a bounty of hardware and software to track and manage our general health, activity, fertility, pregnancy, mood, and just about anything under the sun. A combination of convenience and cost-savings drives our desire to track and manage our health using our mobile devices rather than deal with an inconvenient and costly healthcare environment. This has given way to over 200,000 mobile health apps and an increasing amount of people downloading and using them.

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But finding a useful health app is like searching for a needle in a haystack…

According to a NYU Langone Medical Center study, 58% of people have downloaded a health app, but only half of those people continue to use the app. Although 9 out of 10 want a doctor to prescribe a health app, download decisions are driven by App Store searches and reviews rather than by a doctor’s recommendation. The healthcare community just doesn’t know what to do with apps yet, largely due to a lack of evidence on their utility. For consumers, continued app use is based on whether or not an app delivers on its intended purpose while being easy and enjoyable to use. Apps that couple smart design with empowering, data-driven insights are winning this race.

According to Dr. Robert Anderson and Martha Funnell, MS, RN, CDE, empowerment, “involves facilitating and supporting [people] to reflect on their experience… Such reflection often leads to their enhanced awareness and understanding of the consequences of their [behaviors and] decisions.” Digital solutions that leverage data to facilitate self-reflection, awareness, and understanding are not only checking this box, but may be the heaviest hitters in a very saturated marketplace. “Informed decision-making is a critical component of empowerment. Apps and other technologies are a powerful way for people to see their data and make more informed day-to day decisions about managing diabetes. We used to think blood glucose testing data and other data were judgments; but, in fact, that data is the best guide for what people need to be doing right now. They help us think about what we could do differently the next time we are in a similar situation, so we achieve the most desirable outcome,” said Funnell.

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Our world has never been more data-driven, and self-care support must be data-driven too.

Mobile health companies like One Drop are harnessing people’s health data to empower and improve individual and population health, generating evidence on the utility of their solutions, and finding creative ways to be a healthcare game changer. It’s a huge nut to crack, but a meaningful and empowering data-driven user experience with clinical evidence will crack it.

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Why Doesn’t My Average Blood Glucose Match My A1C?!

Diabetes Bloodwork - A1C

So, you test your meter for accuracy and everything looks good. You take your average blood glucose (BG) and convert it to A1C using a table, calculator, or equation you find online. Then, you get your blood work done and learn that your actual A1C is…

Not even close! What is the deal? 

It turns out, the relationship between average BG and A1C isn’t as clear as most of us think. After doing some research, I came across a couple of reasons why someone’s actual A1C may be higher or lower than expected…

Time Out. Why Use A1C?

But before we get into that, let’s briefly go over why A1C is used to approximate average glucose over ~3 months:

As glucose enters your blood, it attaches to a protein in your red blood cells called “hemoglobin.”

● Hemoglobin is the same protein that carries oxygen in your bloodstream, and it is what gives blood its red color

A1C measures the total amount of glucose that has attached to your hemoglobin over the lifespan of your red blood cells (typically ~3 months).

OK, now that we’ve got the science down, here’s why your average BG and lab-measured A1C values might not match up:

1. BG meter average does not usually reflect the average over a full 24 hours

This reason is pretty obvious. If you are not on a CGM, it’s tough to get a full picture of your average blood glucose throughout the day. We generally check much more during the day than at night, and nighttime glucose values may be very different from daytime values. We also tend to test more often before eating (when glucose is typically lower), and less often after meals (when glucose is typically higher).

Want to learn more about A1C? Download our Guide to A1C here!

So, for most people, BG meter average doesn’t accurately reflect average blood glucose over a full 24 hours. A1C, on the other hand, does.

If you want your BG meter average to better reflect your A1C values, check more often! And make sure you check at various times throughout the day, including 1-3 hours after eating.

2. The Average BG to A1C conversion equation is not perfect

Most (if not all) average BG to A1C conversion tables and calculators use the below equation to estimate A1C:

Average BG (mg/dL) = 28.7 X A1C (%) – 46.7

 

Diabetes Care - A1C equation

This equation is based on data from a 2008 study of over 500 subjects (268 T1Ds, 159 T2Ds, and 80 non-diabetics) at 10 international centers around the world. The A1C values were all measured in a central laboratory, so differences in laboratory method or technique were not a factor. People were studied for 12 weeks, with two days of CGM and three days of 7-point glucose profiles each week. The BG meters used were carefully standardized and calibrated.

diabetes management - blood sugar

The graph below shows the data used to derive the relationship between average glucose and A1C. As you can see, there is A LOT of scatter. A number of data points are off the trend line by ± 1%. And for some A1C values, the spread is enormous… Check out the range of A1Cs for people with an average glucose of ~110 mg/dL — it goes from below 4% to almost 9%!

So, importantly, the study concluded that the equation could be used to convert A1C to average blood glucose values for “most patients.”  Not all patients, just “most.”

Avg BG v A1CResults of a study of 507 subjects. Published in Diabetes Care 31:1473-1478, 2008.

OK… But why do so many people have A1C values that don’t follow the equation?

Answer: Biological variation.

As it turns out, the biological processes that dictate A1C are not exactly the same for everyone.

The rate that glucose attaches to hemoglobin can vary significantly from person to person:

● For some people, glucose attaches to hemoglobin very quickly. So even if their average blood glucose is 154 mg/dL (which would yield an estimated A1C of 7% using the above equation), their actual A1C may 8% or even higher.

● For others, glucose attaches to hemoglobin very slowly, and for the same average glucose of 154 mg/dL, they may have an actual A1C value in the 6% range or lower.

one drop - diabetes

The rate of red blood cell turnover varies from person to person:

● For some, red blood cells turnover much faster than the typical ~3 months. The faster red blood cells turn over, the less hemoglobin can attach before the red blood cells die, which may lead to a lower-than-expected A1C result.

● For others, red blood cells live much longer than the typical ~3 months. The longer the cells live, the more glucose can attach to the hemoglobin, which may lead to a higher-than-expected A1C result.

Various other factors may also be at play, such as:

● People who give blood, have any internal bleeding, or have some sort of anemia where the red cells break down faster than normal, will lose some older red blood cells with lots of glucose attached to the hemoglobin. As a result, the body will make new red blood cells with glucose-free hemoglobin and the A1C % will be lower than expected.

● People with spleen damage (or whose spleen has been surgically removed) may have more of the older red blood cells, because the spleen is responsible for removing older red blood cells from the body. As a result, these people may have a higher A1C % than expected.

It’s important to note here that A1C is not a perfect predictor of your risk of diabetes complications. It only predicts your complication risk if it accurately represents your average blood glucose. So, if there’s reason to believe that your A1C isn’t a good proxy for blood glucose, you and your healthcare team should not base your diabetes management plan on your A1C. Instead, your plan should be based on your CGM average or BG meter average (assuming you’ve collected enough blood glucose values at various times out throughout the day).

Bottom Line

Your average blood glucose is not really intended to predict your A1C. Rather, A1C is supposed to provide a way to estimate your average blood glucose over time.  Any A1C-based prediction may be off by as much as 20 to 25 mg/dL. For some people, it may make more sense to base diabetes treatment decisions off of their BG meter average than their laboratory-measured A1C.

diabetes management - blood glucose

One Drop Guide to Type 2 Diabetes

But first: what is it even?

Type 2 diabetes (T2D), also known as diabetes mellitus type 2, is a type of diabetes in which glucose builds up in the bloodstream due to insulin resistance and low insulin levels. Insulin, which you can learn about here, is the hormone that regulates blood sugar.

Start your One Drop $10 trial today

But let’s dig a bit deeper, as far back as the ancient Egyptian pyramids. While most people refer to it today as T2D, diabetes mellitus type 2, as it’s scientifically recognized, has a very intriguing etymology. Egyptian manuscripts dating back to 1500 B.C (😱) record the symptoms of a deadly disease that caused frequent urination and unquenchable thirst. Around the same time, Indian physicians were seeing the same no-name killer. Victims’ urine attracted ants and flies, which eventually spurred those same physicians to coin the term madhumeha, or ‘honey urine.’

diabetes mellitus type 2

From madhumeha to mellitus

Fast forward (and move your maps 🗺) to Greece in the 1st Century AD. Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (others argue it was Apollonius of Memphis) coins the word diabetes, the Greek word for siphon (to pass through). Then, in 1978, British Surgeon-General John Rollo adds Latin term mellitus (“of or pertaining to honey”) to create the terminology as we know it today: diabetes mellitus (sweet siphon), type 1 and type 2.

Currently, there is no cure for type 2 diabetes. But you can manage type 2 diabetes well and avoid complications with a good diet, regular exercise, and, in most cases, some medication (e.g., metformin, insulin, etc.). Anyone can live a long and healthy life with T2D! The key is keeping blood glucose in range and sticking to a mindful, healthy lifestyle.

The Ultimate Guide to Type 2 Diabetes

In order to manage diabetes well, it’s important to understand exactly how diabetes works. That’s why we’ve created the One Drop Guide to T2D:

— to help you understand the basics of T2D, including the role of the pancreas and insulin

— to show you ways you can help your body achieve balance and lower your blood sugar levels

Enjoy!

diabetes mellitus type 2

American College of Physicians publishes new A1c guidelines. We strongly disagree.

ideal-a1c-for-type-2-diabetes

ACP A1c Guidelines

This week, the American College of Physicians published new guidance on the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Like many in the diabetes community, I was left shaking my head about the recommendations, which include a target A1c for people with type 2 diabetes between 7-8%. This is in contrast to the longstanding ADA recommendation of 7% for all people with diabetes.

ideal-a1c-for-type-2-diabetes

Whoa. That’s Confusing.

Even more confusing is the recommendation that doctors ‘de-intensify’ treatment for people with type 2 diabetes who are meeting their A1c target. That’s like telling a teenager ‘Just drive faster and don’t worry too much about the speed limit.’

ideal-a1c-for-type-2-diabetes

This new guidance is baffling from a medical point of view, because it’s known that having an A1c over 7% significantly increases your risk for complications, including severe visual impairment (blindness), extensive nerve damage, and kidney disease, just to name a few.

Let’s Talk Management. Real Management.

But what shocks me most is the message of disempowerment that the ACP is sending to people with diabetes. Managing isn’t always easy, but I am a firm believer that it’s doable. And we have plenty of evidence that it is! When I read these recommendations, it tells me that that the American College of Physicians doesn’t believe that people with diabetes can manage it well. I get the impression that they believe that people aren’t capable of keeping their blood sugars in their target range; those that can don’t have the ability to deal with low blood sugars.

So Then – What is an Ideal A1c for Type 2 Diabetes?

This sends the message that many doctors would rather change the rules to give their patients (and themselves) the impression they are providing good care, rather than actually providing it. But no matter what the rules are, they do not change the fact that having an A1C above 7% is not good for you. The research clearly shows that most people’s ideal A1c should be below 7% (and some say 6.5%) to reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

ideal-a1c-for-type-2-diabetes

We Deserve Better

People with type 2 diabetes deserve better from the American College of Physicians. They deserve better medical care, but just as importantly they deserve to have health care teams (and systems) who believe in them and who will empower them to play the key role in their self-care. So many people with diabetes want to manage better, but they’re not confident that they can. With this guidance, the American College of Physicians isn’t doing much to help.

At One Drop, we’re confident that people can live well with diabetes. We know from experience that by giving people education, tools, and support, they will gain the confidence they need to get there. When people meet their ideal A1c, we celebrate with them, and we work with them to stay on track to maintain their gains. Just take a look at all of our clinical trials.

We see evidence that people can live great lives while managing diabetes well every day.

We believe that people with diabetes should be empowered to take care of themselves, and we’re committed to standing by their side every step of the way.

Metformin: The Key to Longer Life?

Ancient Remedy

Metformin is no new kid on the block. The so-called “wonder drug” has been healing people since the middle ages by way of French lilac (plant name: Galega officinalis), the active ingredient in today’s metformin. The flower treated what we now know to be symptoms of diabetes.

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In 1922, the specific compound we now use today was first discovered. By 1950, French scientist Jean Sterne recognized the pill’s blood sugar-lowering abilities and began administering it to patients. He’s the guy that coined the term you might be more familiar with, Glucophage. AKA “glucose eater.” [insert diabetes Pacman 👾]

Modern Metformin

Today, metformin is the front-line medication for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes treatment. Study after study (after multiple other studies) has shown how the drug, coupled with lifestyle changes (like food choices, exercise, stress-levels) can delay or prevent diabetes altogether. It’s also the go-to treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Additionally, more and more talk continues to arise surrounding its benefits in type 1 diabetes. Metformin has resulted in decreased insulin dosing and decreased A1c in people with type 1 diabetes. (I’ll be the first to admit: as a T1D, I love my metformin.)

And as if that’s not enough, countless other forms of research point to metformin’s beneficial qualities to cognitive function, as well as its anti-cancer, anti-cardiovascular disease, and anti-aging properties. It’s that last property, anti-aging, that has scientists truly wondering, and studying, if metformin is the miracle drug. The world’s first anti-aging pill.

Fountain of Youth?

It could be. And right now, scientists are studying exactly that in clinical trial TAME. While there’s no true biological marker for ‘aging,’ per se, scientists are, instead, measuring whether or not the pill can delay the onset of chronic diseases. So far, all signs point to yes. The pill directly targets the fundamental processes of aging (aging being the preeminent risk-factor). Metformin-takers are living longer, seeing fewer cardiovascular episodes, and are less likely to suffer from cancer. Of those that do have cancer, they’re living longer with cancer than those who do not take metformin.

It’s important to note that scientists aren’t looking for ways to live forever in the midst of all this research. Rather, they’re trying to stave off all the bad parts of aging. They’re trying to lengthen our healthspan, not our lifespan, so that we spend less life living sick. Brilliant concept. 🙌

To Be Continued

No scientific results are out yet. Those should be coming in the next few years from that TAME study. Regardless, many people are already hopping on the M train. In a recent New Yorker article, biochemist and Silicon Valley startup co-founder Ned David said metformin is part of his daily routine. David, who is forty-nine, literally studies aging for a career. He looks almost 20 years younger than he actually is, and shows no signs of aging. David, along with a growing number of Sillicon Valley execs, attributes his aging (or lack thereof) success to the anti-aging pill. 💊

One Drop Announces Regulatory Approval And Launch In Canada

Company announces regulatory approval of mobile blood glucose monitoring system One Drop | Chrome and the official launch of its direct-to-consumer subscription services, One Drop | Premium & Plus, throughout Canada

NEW YORKNov. 6, 2017 — One Drop today announced Health Canada approval for One Drop | Chrome, its Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose monitoring system that syncs directly with the One Drop | Mobile app. One Drop | Chrome is available as part of One Drop’s Premium and Plus subscriptions plans, marrying modern design with evidence-based diabetes management strategies that improve clinical outcomes at a fraction of the cost of current standards of care. One Drop’s complete diabetes management platform — hassle-free blood glucose testing supplies and 24/7 live in-app support from diabetes experts — is now available throughout the United StatesCanada, European Union, and United Kingdom, bringing affordable, accessible and clinically effective diabetes care to people with diabetes in 30 countries.

“In delivering the full One Drop experience to Canada, we are offering an essential extension to the Canadian healthcare system, just as we have in the US, EU, and UK,” said CEO and Founder, Jeff Dachis. “You cannot improve health outcomes among people with chronic illness without continuous care. With on-demand advice from diabetes experts and data-driven insights served up every day, we’re delivering hyper-personalized care when and where it’s needed most.”

Today, diabetes affects roughly 500 million people worldwide and accounts for 12% ($825 billion) of global healthcare spend each year due to direct costs, healthcare services, loss of productivity, and disability. These expenses steadily increase the financial burden of diabetes on both individuals and governments, worsening health outcomes by placing essential treatment out of reach for millions of people. Even in Canada, where healthcare is publicly funded nationwide, people with diabetes face many of the same difficulties as Americans in managing their care: the available technology is antiquated and there is no support for patients between clinic visits.

One Drop brings diabetes care to the 21st century, dramatically improves health outcomes, and directly reduces costs for both payers and people with diabetes. Starting at $19.95 per month, One Drop’s monthly subscription services provide:

One Drop | Chrome and Testing Supplies: One Drop | Chrome not only meets the highest standards of clinical accuracy, but also wirelessly transmits blood glucose data directly to the cloud via the One Drop | Mobile app for iOS and Android. Blood glucose test strips are delivered directly to the doors of Premium and Plus subscribers — no prescriptions, no insurance, no appointments, and no hassles.

One Drop | Experts for Anytime Care: One Drop | Experts moves diabetes education out of the clinic and into the lives of people with diabetes. Each subscriber has his/her own “Expert” (Certified Diabetes Educator) available 24/7 for guidance, support, and anytime care. Experts deliver personalized digital therapeutics programs to help people with diabetes define and achieve their health management goals. Subscribers can communicate with their Experts anytime via in-app chat; all data recorded in the app is available to Experts in real-time, allowing them to provide relevant behavioral guidance in the moments when subscribers need it most. No appointments necessary.

One Drop | Mobile for Data-Driven Insights: One Drop | Mobile is an award-winning, cloud-based diabetes management solution delivered entirely via mobile app on iOS and Android. One Drop | Mobile provides real-time and historical blood glucose data and analytics to subscribers and their healthcare providers, allowing both to see relationships between specific health behaviors and health outcomes. One Drop | Mobile also includes a fully-featured Apple WatchOS app for logging and analyzing diabetes data on the go. One Drop | Mobile is the only diabetes management platform that offers comprehensive self-care, peer-support, and expert support all in one place.

One Drop | Mobile is available for free in the App Store and on Google Play in seven languages — English, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, French, German, and Russian — and is used by people with diabetes in over 200 countries worldwide. Full integration with Apple HealthKit, Google Fit, Dexcom, and Fitbit allows One Drop | Mobile users to sync blood glucose, fitness, nutrition, and other health data from thousands of apps and devices.

In just over two years, over 1/2 million One Drop | Mobile users have contributed over 500 million health data points toward better understanding diabetes. Cumulatively, One Drop users have logged in 8,500,000 times, spent more than 13,000,000 minutes in the app tracking and analyzing blood glucose, medication, food, and physical activity, and contributed to the growing body of health data informing the future of diabetes self-care.

“Any diabetes ‘solution’ must drive positive clinical results,” said Dachis. “With One Drop, we are delivering a well-designed, evidence-based diabetes solution that is accessible, affordable, scalable, and effective to anyone, anywhere in the world. In doing so, we reach our goal of empowering everyone with diabetes to make better choices, lead fuller lives, and achieve meaningful improvements in their health.”

ABOUT ONE DROP
One Drop (Informed Data Systems Inc.) is a digital health company harnessing the power of mobile computing and data science to transform the lives of everyone with diabetes worldwide.

The One Drop platform is evidence-based and clinically effective. It brings affordable, accessible diabetes care to everyone with diabetes and a smartphone, as well as their insurers and health care providers. One Drop | Chrome is sold exclusively by One Drop (http://getonedrop.com), Amazon (http://www.amazon.com), and Apple (http://store.apple.com). One Drop’s consumer subscription services are available for purchase in-app (iOS and Android) and at http://getonedrop.com. One Drop | Mobile is available for free download worldwide (iOS and Android). For more information, contact just@onedrop.today.

Diabetes & Eye Care: Keep Your Vision Sharp

We’ve had huge advancements in eye care.

Thanks to new diabetes medications and devices, it has become easier than ever to improve our diabetes control and reduce the chances of developing severe eye complications.

Additionally, new cutting edge eye tests and treatments have played a major role in the decrease of diabetes retinopathy.

So much so, that the American Diabetes Association has published its first position statement on the subject in 15 years. The position statement recognizes that “diabetic retinopathy diagnostic assessment and treatment options have improved dramatically”. It also emphasizes the importance of controlling glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels to minimize the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy and of reducing its progression.

It’s easy to keep an eye on your eyes. Here’s how to make eye care a part of your daily routine.

6 tips to help you keep your eyes healthy and avoid complications related to diabetes.  

1. Schedule regular checkups.

Make an appointment with your eye doctor at least once a year. It is much easier to find and treat problems early with regular monitoring. Regular tests like dilating the pupil will help your doctor view the blood vessels in your eye and check for damage. Also, talk to your doctor about eye care specific to your needs – contacts lenses, eye drops, glasses, etc.

2. Check blood sugars often.

Maintaining your blood glucoses will help prevent damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. An A1c test can help you gauge what your average blood glucose is; aim for 7️⃣% or below.

3. Manage your blood pressure.

High blood pressure alone can cause eye problems. If you have high blood pressure ⬆️↗️ and diabetes, talk to your doctor about ways to reduce your blood pressure (medication, diet, exercise). Also be sure to have your blood pressure checked regularly. For most people, it should be 140/80 or lower.

4. Check your cholesterol levels.

Get your cholesterol checked regularly. High levels of “bad” LDL are linked to blood vessel damage. Boost “good” HDL cholesterol by eating heart healthy foods, cutting out trans fats and exercising regularly. Talk to your doctor about ways you can better control your cholesterol levels. ❤️

5. Get moving.

Exercise helps you control your blood glucose, shed pounds and manage your blood pressure. ‍Talk to your doctor about a workout plan that is best for you.

6. Taste the rainbow.

A healthy diet filled with colorful foods will help you maintain or lose weight, reduce blood pressure and provide your body with essential nutrients and vitamins. Try to incorporate dark leafy greens, organic eggs (especially the yolks), fatty fish like salmon, fruits high in vitamin C and almonds into your diet. Avoid excessive carbs, this can result in high insulin levels and can disturb eyeball growth.

ONE DROP | MOBILE APP WITH ONE DROP | EXPERTS ON IPHONE AND APPLE WATCH LOWERS A1C BY 1.2% IN 3 MONTHS

One Drop | Experts + Apple Watch

Company announces study results demonstrating a 1.2% absolute reduction in A1c among people with type 2 diabetes using One Drop | Mobile with One Drop | Experts personalized diabetes coaching on iPhone and Apple Watch

New York, NY — September 7, 2017 — One Drop will present real-world data from an evaluation of One Drop | Experts with the Apple Watch at the Stanford Medicine X Conference next week. Using retrospective app-collected data, the company will report peer-reviewed drastic improvements in self-care and blood glucose among people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Specifically, people with type 2 diabetes and A1c levels equal to or greater than 7.5% who used the One Drop | Mobile app with One Drop | Experts on iPhone and Apple Watch for three months saw a 1.2% absolute reduction in A1C. See abstract for additional details.

One Drop is a free, award-winning, cloud-based diabetes management solution available on iOS, watchOS, Android, and Amazon Alexa. On iOS and Android, the One Drop | Mobile app allows people to store and track self-care behaviors (including blood glucose checks, medication doses, physical activity and food intake) manually and passively via the One Drop | Chrome Bluetooth-connected glucose meter, as well as thousands of other health tracking devices and apps through Apple HealthKit and Google Fit. The fully-featured watchOS app allows users to track the same self-care data, and view data-driven insights and statistics, right on their Watch face.

One Drop | Experts is an ADA-recognized diabetes education* and coaching service delivered entirely through the One Drop | Mobile app. The “Experts” are Certified Diabetes Educators available 24/7 for guidance, support, and anytime care. Experts deliver personalized digital therapeutics programs to help people with diabetes define and achieve their health management goals. Users can communicate with their Experts anytime via in-app chat; all data recorded in the app is available to Experts in real-time, allowing them to provide personalized behavioral guidance when it’s most relevant. One Drop is also the only diabetes management platform that offers comprehensive self-care, peer-support, and expert support all in one place.

Last year, Evidation Health Inc. recruited 144 U.S. adults with T2D to complete a survey, receive an Apple Watch, and use the One Drop | Mobile app on iOS and watchOS in combination with the One Drop | Experts program. Using real-world, app-tracked data, One Drop found improvements in:

• Weekly physical activity: +35 minutes

• Carbohydrate intake per meal: -20 grams

• Average blood glucose: -35 mg/dL (a -1.2% A1c reduction)

Evidation Health Inc. recruited an additional 146 people to use the One Drop | Experts program with the One Drop | Mobile app on iOS only (without an Apple Watch). Results presented at the 77th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association included an A1c improvement of -0.90% among study completers and -1.00% among active users [1]. Leveraging app-collected data, One Drop reported these same users improved, but not to the same degree as Apple Watch users [2]:

• Weekly physical activity: +25 minutes

• Carbohydrate intake per meal: -15 grams

• Average blood glucose: -29 mg/dL (a 1.00% A1c reduction)

“Evaluating whether we’re moving the needle and affecting health outcomes is critical at One Drop,” says Jeff Dachis, CEO and Founder of One Drop. “We’re harnessing real-world data to understand One Drop’s impact. So far, outcomes are consistent, compelling, and enhanced by the Apple Watch.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration just released final guidance on real-world data, which can be user-generated in an app like One Drop. According to the FDA document, when data is relevant and reliable, it may constitute valid scientific evidence.

“Our goals at One Drop are to improve the health of our users and to give them an incredible experience while they do it. At this intersection, we achieve meaningful outcomes,” says Dr. Chandra Osborn, Vice President of Health and Behavioral Informatics at One Drop. “With the help of Apple, we combine relevant and reliable passively-collected data, manually-entered data collected from our app, and objective glucose data from our meter, and we analyze all of them with the rigorous standards of scientific excellence.”

1 Kumar S., et al. Impact of a diabetes mobile app with in-app coaching on glycemic control. Late-breaking peer-reviewed poster presentation at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Diabetes Association; San Diego, CA, USA, June 2017.
2 Osborn C.Y., et al The One Drop mobile app with in-app coaching improves blood glucose and self-care. Peer-reviewed poster presentation at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Diabetes Association; San Diego, CA, USA, June 2017.

ABOUT ONE DROP

One Drop (Informed Data Systems Inc.) is a digital health company harnessing the power of mobile computing and data science to transform the lives of everyone with diabetes worldwide.

The One Drop platform is evidence-based and clinically effective. It brings affordable, accessible diabetes care to everyone with diabetes and a smartphone, as well as their insurers and health care providers. One Drop | Chrome is sold exclusively by One Drop (iOS, Android, and http://onedrop.today/), Amazon (http://www.amazon.com), and Apple (http://store.apple.com). One Drop’s consumer subscription services are available for purchase in-app (iOS and Android) and at http://onedrop.today. The One Drop | Mobile solution is available for free download worldwide (iOS and Android). For more information, contact just@onedrop.today.

*The American Diabetes Association recognizes this education service as meeting the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support. Learn more at http://www.onedrop.today.

ONE DROP LAUNCHES POWER OF 10 PROGRAM TO PROVIDE FREE ADA-RECOGNIZED DIABETES EDUCATION AND SUPPORT TO THOSE MOST IN NEED

For every One Drop subscription sold, One Drop is donating 10 One Drop | Experts subscriptions for its ADA-Recognized diabetes support and education program

New York, NY — September 6, 2017 — One Drop today announced the Power of 10, a charitable giving program where, for every One Drop subscription sold, One Drop is donating 10 subscriptions to One Drop | Experts, its ADA-Recognized digital diabetes support and education* program, to medically underserved and uninsured people with diabetes.

Today, over 30 million Americans are living with diabetes and another 90 million are living with prediabetes. It remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States and takes a particularly hard toll on the “diabetes belt” — an area spanning 15 states in the Southeast with high rates of poverty, low levels of college educational attainment, and the highest rates of diabetes and obesity in the country. Access to quality healthcare is a major problem for people in these areas, as well as many other Americans who are currently underinsured, without health insurance, or otherwise medically underserved.

“Our patients have limited resources and time for diabetes management,” said Parker Panovec, MD, Medical Director of Faith Family Medical Center. “We are excited about the prospect of One Drop’s Power of 10 program and its potential to improve diabetic control and the lives of our patients.”

“Every 6 seconds a person dies from diabetes and the medically underserved are the worst hit,” said Jeff Dachis, CEO and Founder of One Drop. “Diabetes itself is not a death sentence. It is a manageable condition and many of these deaths can be prevented with better diabetes education. Through the Power of 10, One Drop is partnering with our customers and clinics nationwide to ensure every single person in America diagnosed with diabetes has the insights, information, and support they need to succeed. For every single subscription we sell in the US, whether through payers, employers, health systems or direct to consumers, One Drop will donate 10 One Drop | Experts subscriptions to those most in need, without limitations.”

One Drop | Experts is a clinically-validated, scalable diabetes education and coaching program delivered entirely through the One Drop | Mobile app. It is the first and only digital coaching program to receive ADA recognition, identifying One Drop | Experts as meeting the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (NSDSMES). The “Experts” are Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) who work one-on-one with people with diabetes, providing personalized educational content and insights, as well as ongoing support, encouragement and accountability. One Drop | Experts are available 24/7, delivering all content and advice via in-app chat anytime, anywhere and without prescriptions, hassles, or appointments.

One Drop | Experts has proven to be uniquely engaging, combining the use of mobile technology, real-time health data and human support to empower people with diabetes to take an active role in self-care and achieve healthier outcomes. Earlier this year at the American Diabetes Association 77th Scientific Sessions, Evidation Health Inc. reported results of a study evaluating the One Drop | Mobile app and One Drop | Experts coaching service. In just 3 months, people with type 2 diabetes improved their A1c by [1]:

• -0.90% among study completers;
• -1.00% among active users who used the app and messaged a coach at least once; and
• -1.32% among active users with baseline A1c ≥ 9.0%.

Leveraging data collected in-app, One Drop reported these users [2]:

• reduced carbohydrate intake by >10 grams per meal;
• increased activity by 25 minutes per week;
• decreased average blood glucose by 29 mg/dL (a 1.00% A1c reduction);
• reduced glycemic variability; and
• increased the percentage of in-range blood glucose values.

To learn more about the Power of 10, visit http://onedrop.today/powerof10.

[1] Kumar S., et al. Impact of a diabetes mobile app with in-app coaching on glycemic control. Late-breaking peer-reviewed poster presentation at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Diabetes Association; San Diego, CA, USA, June 2017.
[2] Osborn C.Y., et al The One Drop mobile app with in-app coaching improves blood glucose and self-care. Peer-reviewed poster presentation at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Diabetes Association; San Diego, CA, USA, June 2017.

ABOUT ONE DROP
One Drop (Informed Data Systems Inc.) is a digital health company harnessing the power of mobile computing and data science to transform the lives of everyone with diabetes worldwide.

The One Drop platform is evidence-based and clinically effective. It brings affordable, accessible diabetes care to everyone with diabetes and a smartphone, as well as their insurers and health care providers. One Drop’s current offerings include:

One Drop | Chrome: One Drop’s FDA-approved, CE-certified Bluetooth wireless blood glucose monitoring system, which meets the highest standards of clinical accuracy and wirelessly transmits blood glucose data to the cloud via the One Drop | Mobile app for iOS and Android.

One Drop | Plus: One Drop’s newest subscription offerings, providing 50 to 100 blood glucose test strips per month for One Drop | Chrome and unlimited coaching via One Drop | Experts, starting at $13 per month.

One Drop | Premium: One Drop’s unlimited subscription, providing unlimited blood glucose test strips for One Drop | Chrome and unlimited coaching via One Drop | Experts, starting at $33 per month.

One Drop | Experts: One Drop’s 24/7, on-demand, digital diabetes education and coaching service, available as a standalone subscription, starting at $11 per month.* Each One Drop | Experts subscriber has his/her own “Expert” (Certified Diabetes Educator) available 24/7 for guidance, support, and anytime care. Experts deliver personalized digital therapeutics programs, including ADA-recognized diabetes education, to help people with diabetes define and achieve their health management goals. Subscribers can communicate with their Experts anytime via in-app chat; all data recorded in the app is available to Experts in real-time, allowing them to provide personalized behavioral guidance when subscribers need it most — no appointments necessary.

One Drop | Mobile: One Drop’s free, award-winning, cloud-based diabetes management solution delivered entirely via mobile app on iOS and Android. One Drop | Mobile provides real-time and historical blood glucose data and analytics to people with diabetes and their healthcare providers, allowing both to see relationships between specific health behaviors and health outcomes. One Drop | Mobile includes a fully-featured Apple WatchOS app for logging and analyzing diabetes data on the go. One Drop | Mobile is the only diabetes management platform that offers comprehensive self-care, peer-support, and expert support all in one place.

One Drop | Professional: One Drop’s HIPPA-compliant enterprise solution for insurers, healthcare provider networks, self-insured employers, and drug/device manufacturers seeking to dramatically improve health outcomes and lower the cost of caring for people with diabetes. One Drop | Professional delivers real-time data, real-time messaging, custom branding, custom content delivery, custom educational support, EMR/EHR integration, and the most affordable, effective, turnkey diabetes solution in market.

One Drop | Chrome is sold exclusively by One Drop (iOS,Android, and http://onedrop.today/), Amazon (http://www.amazon.com), and Apple (http://store.apple.com). One Drop’s consumer subscription services are available for purchase in-app (iOS andAndroid) and at http://onedrop.today. The One Drop | Mobile solution is available for free download worldwide (iOS andAndroid). For more information, contact just@onedrop.today.

*The American Diabetes Association recognizes this education service as meeting the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

Press Contact:
Rachel M. Sanchez
rachel@onedrop.today